Wildflower Beauty Amidst Urban Chaos

 

While stuck in traffic recently, my eye was drawn to a patch of wildflowers from some volunteer Black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta) blooming amidst the concrete chaos of a major road construction project. A bit of serenity amidst the noisy clamor of biDSC_0751g machines.

A slice of abandoned lawn had been bisected by a new sidewalk along with the attendant soil disturbance. In total, I counted six different species of wildflowers that had sprung up from the long-dormant seed bank that sleeps in the soil of most “waste areas”. Besides the Black-eyed Susans, there were two species of Coreopsis, Showy Evening Primrose, Chicory, and Heath Aster.

There were also the companion insects that follow the native plants–and the birds and lizards, etc. that follow the insects. It is the predictable pattern of ecological succession when a mowed lawn is disturbed and then left alone. Wildflowers are survivors. Over the years,

Notice the hole in one of the petals and the caterpillar (a.k.a. bird food) that made it.

Notice the hole in one of the petals and the caterpillar (a.k.a. bird food) that made it. Click on photo to enlarge.

one by one, seeds were deposited there. Seeds survive in the soil and wait for the right time and conditions. And then they grow and blossom for our delight–even amidst the noisy chaos of the city.

Here are more images:

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Chicory, Tickseed Coreopsis, and Black-eyed Susan.